My World Tuesday: Haunted, Gettysburg

Here's part of a mural in the museum at the Gettysburg Visitors Center. I stopped twice in this small town on the southern border of Pennsylvania when I made my most recent trip to North Carolina. The spirits of all who fought there pervade the area. There is a tranquility, a calm, that embraces me every time I am there. This pilgrimage of sorts has me looking closely, carefully, at all that makes my country. We have an obligation to love it well.

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The photo below captures a montage of images of Union soldiers who served at Gettysburg. Beside it was a montage of photos of Confederate soldiers.

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This is the Gettysburg train station, from which point President Lincoln walked without bodyguards to David Wills's home when the battlefield was consecrated as a resting place in November, 1863.

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Wills's home is the brick building in the left of the next photo. Wills oversaw the creation of the National Cemetery in Gettysburg. Will's hosted the President, who stayed in the room in the bottom photo. There, he put the final touches on the Gettysburg Address.

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I bought a copy of At Gettysburg, or What a Girl Saw and Heart of the Battle, a True Narrative, by Mrs. Tillie (Pierce) Alleman when I was there. It's an extraordinary book that leaves out none of the grit of that three-day battle at the same time it is full of heart and a refreshing, clearly stated opinion on the matter. She concludes: "What in my girlhood was a teeming and attractive landscape spread out by the Omnipotent Hand to teach us of His goodness has by His own direction become a field for profound thought, where, through coming ages, will be taught lessons of loyalty, patriotism, and sacrifice."

Comments

  1. These places always leave me with mixed emotions. I am always respectful and thankful.

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  2. How many of those books could be written today in other places around the world? Nearly a century and a half has passed since armies clashed on battlefields within our borders, and in that time I think perhaps we sometimes take that peace for granted. But in places all around the world, there are Tillie Alleman's seeing the same horrors today.

    I should get back to Gettysburg. I haven't been since I was maybe 10 or 11. I don't imagine much has changed since then though. The dead are pretty easy to please.

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  3. I would love to see it.

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  4. I've been to Gettysburg many decades ago and it greatly impressed me. Enjoyed your photos.

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  5. Have you read Connie Willis' Lincoln's Dreams? I highly recommend it, its fiction and extremely good/engaging

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  6. What a great adventure! I have never been, but I should go!

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  7. Sandy, you've inspired me to visit this emotionally charged, significant place.

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  8. Wow, that is beautiful! I would love to visit Gettysburg.

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  9. Fantastic post for the day, Sandy!! I have always wanted to visit there, so I thank you for the tour. I get the haunted feeling you speak of just looking at the pictures. Enjoy your week!

    Sylvia

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  10. Very lovely shots of the place. The wordings in the mural and montage of image of soldiers is very nice.

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  11. Thanks ~ when I was a child my dad would always take us on family trips to everywhere Lincoln was! Great memories of the trips.

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  12. Excellent post and illustrations Sandy. I haven't been there since I was a child.

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  13. Hi Sandy,
    Very interesting post on a subject I know little of. I was struck by your final quote and similarities between the childhood of this, then young girl and a woman I met in Normandy two years ago. She runs the Café Gondrée besides the Pegasus Bridge that was liberated by Allied Forces in 1945, who then went on to liberate the rest of France. In 1945 her parents owned the café and were instrumental in the Resistance. She didn't go on to write a book about it, but the café is now a museum to the events, and pretty much the same could be said there. The pity is that events throughout the world in recent decades have shown that lessons have not been learned from the terrible events of these past times.
    Janice.

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  14. I was there many years ago and must say Gettysburg truly is a place that evokes strong emotions.

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  15. Wonderful post and photos on Gettysburg, Sandy.

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  16. What interesting photos.

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  17. Anonymous4:35 PM

    another wonderful post sandy. have a great week.

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  18. Such history.
    If only those photos could speak!

    Nuts in May

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  19. I'm going to look for that book : she seems to have a wonderful vew and insight.

    We drove through Gettysburg last summer but didn't have a chance to really look around, visit the shops and museums, etc. I want to do that someday.

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  20. Thanks for sharing Gettysburg with me through your eyes! I am enjoying your travels.

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  21. Anonymous6:08 PM

    It's always amazing at places like these to imagine the rich and colorful history that happened there, the great men that walked the same paths, and the buildings that still stand. Great post.

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  22. Lucky to have got to see these places through your post. Interesting read about the history of the place.

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  23. fab post. i went through there last summer and plan on another trip this year when i can visit at length with hubby.
    gettysburg is special in the history of our great nation and more should visit.
    have a great week.

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  24. Sandy: So much history at this famous battlefield. If this had not happened this way where would our country be today.

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  25. an excellent post -so fascinating!

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  26. Someday I hope to go there.

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  27. You did a great job of bringing this historic place to us. I love how you used sepia for some of the shots. Just perfect.

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  28. This significant and important places always make me very sad and thoughtful.
    Really a great post, Sandy.

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  29. Thanks for sharing Sandy, now I wish I could read the book myself and yes,
    you beautiful pics that came with your post!

    It's totally, absolutely awesome!

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  30. What a powerful effect that place must have on all who visit, such an important piece of our history.

    PS The no-mess aspect of the coffee machine was definitely what convinced me. I ground my own for years, what a hassle. Now I just pop in a pod, steam the milk and I'm good to go :).

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  31. So much history - hopefully we can learn from it too.

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  32. A great commemmoration.

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  34. I wish I could visit Gettysburg some day. What a great monument to the men who died there.

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  35. I really really enjoyed reading your historical comments and sharing your photos and thoughts. Thanks so much.

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  36. I've always wanted to go there-and your post makes me want to go more. Love the photos.

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  37. It's nice to visit that place, must be full of stories.

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  38. How interesting to see Gettsyburg in winter with snow on the ground. I've only been there in the summertime. That montage is amazing. Thanks for sharing ;-)
    Hugs and blessings,

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  39. Of course I was in Gettysburg when I was too young to appreciate and revel in it's history. I would like to go back again some day-your pics are fascintating!

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  40. those photos of the men were fascinating; very ghostly; i was thinking the other day how much more history is on your coast then on ours.

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