Our World Tuesday: Sacred Dunes

These dunes are a triumph.
They are the result of the hard work and perseverance of people who care that the dunes are healthy, that the plant life holding them together are indigenous and can the therefore stand the test of time and weather.
This year, North Topsail Beach has gone to considerable effort to plant indigenous grasses in the dunes to bolster the places that are most vulnerable during hurricane season. These places are the same ones that cradle the eggs of sea turtles.  This is a special, magical, place that nurtures the mystery of ancient life and affirms it at the same time it tolerates fools who can't hold their beer as they hang all over their over-loud girlfriends. Silence, magic, and mystery prevail.  It's cool.
The other day when I saw a boy climb through the dunes rather than use the cross-over just on the other side of his mother, I told him he needed to use the steps to protect the dunes, which are cherished habitat. His shortcut took him right alongside a turtle nest, which was marked off with orange ribbon and a sign admonishing the reader that messing with the nest could result in a pretty stiff fine. The young man was plowing through  recently planted grasses meant to strengthen the dune.

His mother shouted, "Go away, stupid bitch!" She did not speak much English; she was furious that I, a stranger, addressed her child. The cursing, the tone:  I was supposed to shrivel up and blow away. 

But I was offended her kid was wrecking the dune and coming mighty close to wrecking a turtle nest. Who was she to come in here and do what she damn well wanted at the expense of all who had worked so hard to create a healthy environment and at expense of endangered turtles?  Who was she to endanger the well-being of this ancient animal?  Ignorance--of English, of the environment, of people who care--was no excuse to justify undoing all the good work that has been done on Topsail.  (I think we all have a moral obligation to know where we are and why and a moral responsibility to take the consequences when our behavior causes harm to wherever we are.  No excuses.)

"Respect where you are!" I shouted back and walked away.  

Our World Tuesday

Comments

  1. Good for you, Sandy!! It is so infuriating to see things like that and I can't understand how anyone can not say something!! Such a beautiful place and it does need all the protection it can get!! Thank you!!!

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  2. ah if only she heard it...she might have but does one really understand the damage they do when they are just passing through...and only care for themselves...its all rather sad to me...

    good on them for planting though to protect the dunes...

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  3. glad you stood up for the natural habitat.

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  4. What is wit people and their total disregard for our environment? And what is that child going to turn out like with a mother like that? Grrrrrr!

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  5. Really interesting, Sandy. The environment must be respected, this is important indeed.

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  6. Thank You, Sandy!!!





    ALOHA from Honolulu
    Comfort Spiral
    ~ > < } } ( ° > <3

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  7. simply beautifully captured shots...lovely!

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  8. People need to be reminded. No matter if it doesn't suit them.

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  9. It's hard to deal with ignorance. Glad you're trying. Thanks Sandy.

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  10. Nothing upsets me more than disrespect for the environment! The last shot is wonderful Sandy!

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  11. Good for you!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  12. The dunes on your part of the ocean are amazing and beautiful.

    That's so scary to think about the way that woman is raising her kid...no respect for the environment or for other people. Maybe the child will stop to think why you said it (one can always hope, Pollyanna that I am).

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  13. so good that your spirit insisted on your protecting that which you care for!

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  14. Sometimes, there's not much you can do, but at least you did something!! Good on ya!

    In the town of Patea, in South Taranaki, they have a program to dump green waste, especially Christmas trees, onto the edge of the sand to keep it from being blown away. I was impressed.

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  15. It is sad, how the parents are raising their children today. They have no respect. They just make me mad. I am glad you spoke up! If they get caught again, I hope they are given a stiff fine.

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  16. It's sad that the mother was so rude. Thank goodness there are good people giving their time and energy to preserve as much as we can. Hats off to them!

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  17. Good for you Sandy!!

    I'm seeing on the areas that I go to the sea that over time the powers that be are putting more and more emphasis on protecting the dunes.

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  18. What is wrong with that lady? Ignorance and arrogance.

    You did your best Sandy!

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  19. Well that was rude of her. She could have at least asked what the problem was.
    Sometimes people don't know.
    I'd walk through a short cut if I didn't know but if someone told me nicely I'd respect it.
    She didn't teach her child anything nice that day. That's for sure.

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  20. Sandy: You've reminded me of a non-profit board I once served on called "Families for the Rainforest". It was founded by a buddy of mine from England and his girlfriend, he is a Horticulturist and Tree surgeon by training. Our mission was to access junior high and high schools in the community to raise public awareness of the incredible contributions of rainforests. Your post taught me something new and special about dunes. That foul mouthed Mom is yet another reminder of my need to move to Omaha. Our culture has changed so much. You handled yourself better than I might have. I applaud you, Sandy!

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