Skywatch Friday: Speaking Connecticut

Not everybody speaks Connecticut.  I learned that by leaving it and realizing through my changed perspective how much I love my native language.  By Connecticut, I mean plain talk that is reserved--plain talk prefers silence to saying something that could cause offense but will cause offense to prevent the danger of being misunderstood--if being understood is important enough to deserve the risk.  Boiled down:   you speak when you have to, and you're clear when you do.  This manner of being in most points south of here is considered blunt, direct, rude.  (I know this because I got myself in all kinds of trouble just for being myself and meaning no harm.)  We take that risk because we'd rather be rude than be misunderstood.  In this light, it's ultimately about being loved and respected, loving and respecting.  But we're not about explaining that; this truth should speak for itself--same as we speak for ourselves (when we absolutely have to).

I'm talking about being a Yankee, which doesn't bear talking about because we have a landscape to speak for us and we're not about doing all that talking.  But that landscape.  It is hard and unyielding and lonely and still at the same time it gives us everything we need to live here and now.  We insist on it, and when we don't, we let it.  New Englanders have a strange love affair with Earth.  Call it what you want, though, it is love.  And it asks for no words.  We've learned to live without them.

Skywatch Friday

Comments

  1. sounds like a communication challenge for Yankees. Although some westerners are like that too...lol!

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  2. Anonymous9:46 AM

    Lovely lovely shot and great words too.

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  3. nicely written. coming from the upper midwest, my culture is more that depicted in the movie 'fargo'. non-confrontational. 'no problem'. 'okay then.' 'yup'. :)

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  4. I'm certain that we could all do with less words! A beautiful capture that needs no words, but yours are worth the read and reminder! Have a great weekend, Sandy!

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  5. how we communicate is so intriguing...i would rather someone tell me than try to make me feel better about something wrong...you know...

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  6. I love your big wide open sky!

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  7. Aloha for the land. Different land, same reverence, Sis:-)


    Aloha

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  8. Your words are always clear and honest and I love how you love the earth. Nice post.

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  9. Beautiful shot. I prefer for people to be direct and honest. Although I tend to be wordy most of my closest friends tend to be people of few words.

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  10. I think if we talked less it would be a better world. but instead every one talks.
    I spent the better part of my life listening. I never talked.
    Then one day I began reading the paper and something hit me like a hammer. For once I did have something to say because things were going too far. People who should not be talking were talking too much and hurting too many esp kids.(my kids and your kids).Time to pull in the reins.
    It really is time. So now I never shut up lol

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  11. Lovely photo and great words,Sandy!Have a nice weekend.

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  12. Beautiful and wise Sandy. My husband is a native Ohio-an and he has very much the same take on life. He has taught me a lot about spare careful, caring speech over the years.

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  13. It is good that now you know.

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  14. Sandy, thanks for defining this so succinctly for me! As for a love affair with the land, yes I do! Place has such importance to me and each place has its own personality. I grew up outside in the woods, on the land, in pastures and forest and oceanside. It all means something. It all has its own moods and when I was young I was so in tune with it. I want to feel that way again. Sometimes I do, and sometimes I just pine for that feeling and that place, a place, MY place!

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  15. Great words, Sandy, and I like the amplitude of that beautiful view.

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  16. I think communication can be misunderstood in any region.
    Being from the South, I know that for a fact.
    I love our Earth....God's Earth.
    Am so happy that I have a friend in you.
    Love,
    Jackie

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  17. Nice article, Sandy! like it..\

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  18. How enlightening. I've never been able to put my finger on New Englanders perspective but you've really broken it down clearly. As a Midwesterner, I never take offense to plain talk, I much prefer it to fluff. I can't wait to show your post to my Connecticut friends!

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  19. I don't have much acquaintance with Connecticut, mainly I just hope that I spell it right.
    I grew up in the Mountain West and have relatives in the ranching business and the general regard toward words was the less the better.

    I moved to Texas and boy were things different.

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  20. I like this a lot Sandy. We've noticed some of the differences (not in accents, but in manners of speaking... I'm not sure what word I want) when we travel, but not so much as we would if we stayed longer of course. In any case, I should take a lesson and learn to speak more directly, because I don't always. I'm often overly aware of not wanting to hurt someone's feelings.)

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